Coronavirus USA Updates: New data continues to show virus ‘disproportionately’ affecting black

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Coronavirus USA Updates: New data continues to show virus 'disproportionately' affecting black
Coronavirus USA Updates: New data continues to show virus 'disproportionately' affecting black

Black residents in Wisconsin and Kansas are dying as a result of COVID-19 at some of the highest rates in the country compared to the relative population size, according to an analysis of data from 33 states.

The Kaiser Family Foundation used data from the states across the U.S. that are reporting data on cases and deaths by race and ethnicity.

The foundation found that states without a major city or large black population have been overlooked for the disproportionate ratio of cases and deaths in the black community.

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“Our analysis of these data finds that they continue to paint a sobering picture of how the virus is disproportionately affecting communities of color,” according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

In Wisconsin, where the black population is 6%, the data showed that black people have accounted for 39% of the deaths and 25% of the cases — a four-times higher share of cases and an over six-times higher share of deaths, according to the foundation. Kansas has a black population of 6%, but the data shows that black people have accounted for 33% of the deaths and 17% of the cases — a three times higher share of cases and more than five-times higher share of deaths, the foundation reported.

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In the majority of the 33 states, black people accounted for a higher share of confirmed cases (in 20 of 31 states) and deaths (in 19 of 24 states) compared to their share of the total population, according to the foundation.

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In six of 26 states, the data showed that there was also a disproportionate impact on Hispanic communities.

Iowa and Wisconsin reported the largest relative differences, with a respective 17% of cases compared to a population of 6% and 12% of cases compared to a population of 7%.

Data was largely unavailable for smaller groups, including people who are American Indian or Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander.

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