Denali: Dinosaur Bones Discovered in Park Is a First

0
920
Denali: Dinosaur Bones Discovered in Park Is a First
Denali: Dinosaur Bones Discovered in Park Is a First

Dinosaur bones have been uncovered in Alaska’s Denali National Park, according to the U.S. National Park Service and paleontologists from the University of Alaska Fairbanks who made the find during an expedition in July.

According to a Tuesday press release. The team discovered four different fossil fragments as well as several new fossilized footprints known as “dinosaur trackways.”

Trackways dating back to the Late Cretaceous Period were first found in Denali National Park in 2005, and since then paleontologists have found thousands more, the Park Service says. But this is the first time researchers have discovered dinosaur bones inside the park.

“The research team found four different fragments, including one ossified tendon. The largest is a few inches long,” the National Parks Service wrote. “They are clearly parts of bigger bones from a large animal, ruling out all other animals with a backbone known from this geological period, including mammals, birds and even flying reptiles.”

READ  Thor's hammer discovered in Iceland - shock Viking find (Photo)

According to researchers, the bones are believed to be that of a “large ornithopod dinosaur, probably a hadrosaur.”

READ  Strange 'thing' swimming in Alaska: Has the Loch Ness monster been found?

“These duck-billed, herbivorous dinosaurs were probably the most abundant large animals in Alaska and the primary trackmakers in the park during this time period,” park officials wrote.

Researchers believe the fragments they found are parts of much larger bones that may still be buried in the park. Pat Druckenmiller, curator of earth sciences at the University of Alaska Museum of the North, is leading a project to continue exploring the area over the next several years, the Park Service said.

READ  Knights Templar carvings found under Hertfordshire town centre (Picture)

“Finding these bones opens a new chapter in the story of Denali dinosaurs,” said Pat Druckenmiller in the NPS press release. “That story is still being written as we find new sites, new kinds of dinosaurs and evidence of their behavior.”

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.