Chris Evans hospitalised as he misses Breakfast Show, Report

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Chris Evans hospitalised as he misses Breakfast Show, Report
Chris Evans hospitalised as he misses Breakfast Show, Report

CHRIS Evans was rushed to casualty with kidney stones – after initially mistaking them for trapped wind.

The Virgin Radio DJ, who had crippling stomach pains, spent two nights in hospital following his trip to A&E on Saturday night.

Ultrasound and CT scans showed the presence of a large kidney stone which doctors monitored for 48 hours, before releasing him on Monday.

The star was forced to miss two of his Breakfast Shows, but returned to the airwaves next week.

Last night Chris, 54, told The Sun: “I thought I had trapped wind and general ‘man pain’ most of Saturday.

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“I took paracetamol and waited for nature to take its course…. that didn’t happen.

“Late Saturday night my wife called 111 and we were advised to go to A&E. Which we did.

“After an ultrasound scan and CT scan, it was clear I had a kidney stone on the move.

“I was subsequently admitted to a ward where I was looked after until I came back home on Monday evening.

“I still have the stone, and if it doesn’t come out soon I will need to go back in and have it removed.

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“All the NHS doctors, nurses, porters and consultants were typically amazing, professional, warm, caring – all wrapped up in their usual blanket of selflessness and hilarity.

“Thank you to Shirley, Gabriella, Dan, Sister Sue, Alex, Hazel, Violet, Rose, Fernando, Jessie, Louise, Juna, Molly, Mr Robinson, the great and powerful Mr Bhardwa and Paul from the RAF, who was helping out due to Covid.

“Plus, anyone else I may have met/talked to/annoyed but can’t remember because I was pretty much out of it for the first few hours.”

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The star added: ““Paul from the RAF has, along with countless other service personnel, been drafted in to help relieve some of the pressure within our hospitals.

“They’re doing whatever is necessary wherever they can – something I had no idea was happening.”

Kidney stones typically affect people aged between 30-60.

According to a 2017 survey of female patients – published in the Journal of Pain Research – kidney stones are more painful than childbirth.

The stones can take anywhere between two to four weeks to pass, with patients advised to take painkillers in between.

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